Being a Christian in 21st-century America can bring many different stereotypes to mind. At St. Peter's, we strive to keep Jesus at the center of our modern church through intentional lives of prayer and worship, study of the Word of God, and service to others in Jesus' name. 


Way of Love.jpg

Early in his ministry, Jesus of Nazareth was surrounded by crowds. He turned and asked, “What do you seek?” (John 1:38). For more than a thousand years, monastics have greeted pilgrims knocking on their doors by asking: “What do you seek?” Today, each of us can pause with the same question. As much as the world has changed, the fundamental human hopes and yearnings that draw us to faith may not be so different. For so many ...

WE SEEK LOVE

To know God’s love, to love and be loved by others, and to love ourselves.

WE SEEK FREEDOM

From the many forces — sin, fear, oppression, and division that pull us from living as God created us to be: dignified, whole, and free.

WE SEEK ABUNDANT LIFE

Overflowing with joy, peace, generosity, and delight. Where there is enough for all because we all share with abandon. A life of meaning, given back to God and lived for others.

WE SEEK JESUS

The way of Jesus is the Way of Love, and that way has the power to change lives and change the world.

THEN COME AND FOLLOW...


Faith in Action

The world today holds many stereotypes of Christians and Christianity, and many of them are inaccurate. We strive to faithfully live out the Gospel with intention. For those who feel called to put their faith into action in meaningful ways, and to follow the words of the Gospel and the example of Jesus, we offer the following resources:

 

Reclaiming Jesus

When politics undermines our theology, we must examine that politics. The church’s role is to change the world through the life and love of Jesus Christ. The government’s role is to serve the common good by protecting justice and peace, rewarding good behavior while restraining bad behavior (Romans 13). When that role is undermined by political leadership, faith leaders must stand up and speak out. Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. said, “The church must be reminded that it is not the master or the servant of the state, but rather the conscience of the state.”

 

The Episcopal Public Policy Network

The Episcopal Public Policy Network is a grassroots network of Episcopalians across the country dedicated to carrying out the Baptismal Covenant call to "strive for justice and peace" through the active ministry of public policy advocacy. We engage in advocacy because federal government legislation and policies affect Episcopalians, our brother and sister Anglicans around the world, and the most vulnerable among us. Together, we can help our nation's legislation and policies to become more just.

 

Episcopal Migration Ministries

Episcopal Migration Ministries (EMM) lives the call of welcome by supporting refugees, immigrants, and the communities that embrace them as they walk together in The Episcopal Church’s movement to create loving, liberating, and life-giving relationships rooted in compassion. EMM’s desire to honor the inherent value of human connection brings communities together to love their neighbors as themselves. EMM acts in covenant with individuals and partners to ensure the equity of all voices as they work to serve, engage, and sustain the mission.

 

Vote Faithfully

“We are blessed as a nation to vote. As citizens of this country this is a right, an obligation, and a duty. Go vote. Vote your conscience. Your conscience informed by what it means to love your neighbor, to participate in the process of seeking the common good, to participate in the process of making this a better world. However you vote, go and vote. And do that as followers of Jesus.”  - Presiding Bishop Michael Curry